Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.

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  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      The article presents information on the ambiguity of class among Eastern European Jewish immigrants to the U.S. at the turn of the twentieth century. This "70 year old East New Yorker" was not alone. Many Jewish immigrants of his generation harbored these seemingly contradictory impulses-toward working-class militancy and ambitious entrepreneurship. Unlike the East New Yorker, however, they did not always hold these world views sequentially; they nurtured both tendencies at the same time, sometimes uneasily, sometimes with little friction at all. As militant workers they fought collectively through their unions, radical political parties, and class-based fratemals for higher wages, better conditions, heightened control over work processes, and a more just and egalitarian society. As ambitious entrepreneurs they hoped to attain more personal independence, higher social status, and a better standard of living through individual movement out of the wage-earning working class into the middle class of self-employed shopkeepers, contractors and manufacturers, and professionals.
    • Full Text Word Count:
      8877
    • ISSN:
      0023-656X
    • Accession Number:
      10.1080/00236560124735
    • Accession Number:
      4093363
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SOYER, D. Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Labor History, [s. l.], v. 42, n. 1, p. 45–59, 2001. DOI 10.1080/00236560124735. Disponível em: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=bth&AN=4093363&authtype=ip,sso&custid=swtexas. Acesso em: 5 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Soyer D. Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Labor History. 2001;42(1):45-59. doi:10.1080/00236560124735.
    • AMA11:
      Soyer D. Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Labor History. 2001;42(1):45-59. doi:10.1080/00236560124735
    • APA:
      Soyer, D. (2001). Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Labor History, 42(1), 45–59. https://doi.org/10.1080/00236560124735
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Soyer, Daniel. 2001. “Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” Labor History 42 (1): 45–59. doi:10.1080/00236560124735.
    • Harvard:
      Soyer, D. (2001) ‘Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, Labor History, 42(1), pp. 45–59. doi: 10.1080/00236560124735.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Soyer, D 2001, ‘Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century’, Labor History, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 45–59, viewed 5 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Soyer, Daniel. “Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” Labor History, vol. 42, no. 1, Feb. 2001, pp. 45–59. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/00236560124735.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Soyer, Daniel. “Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” Labor History 42, no. 1 (February 2001): 45–59. doi:10.1080/00236560124735.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Soyer D. Class Conscious Workers as Immigrant Entrepreneurs: The Ambiguity of Class among Eastern European Jewish Immigrants to the United States at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Labor History [Internet]. 2001 Feb [cited 2020 Jul 5];42(1):45–59. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=bth&AN=4093363&authtype=ip,sso&custid=swtexas